Posts Tagged ‘Chris Jarmick’

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NaPoWriMo National Poetry Writing Month Day 20 Prompt for Sunday April 20, 2014 Posted April 19, 2014

April 19, 2014

“Poetry puts starch in your backbone so you can stand, so you can compose your life.”
Maya Angelou

 

Welcome to Day 20 of the NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month) challenge. There’s no fanfare or parade for getting to the two-third mark of the challenge, but if you close your eyes . . . Still plenty of time to write a poem a day from right now till the end of the month, so if you aren’t already committed, feel free to join in.

Now for today’s prompt.

Sunday April 20th Prompt

Prompt 20 – Write a Poem about a family photograph
What will you write about a family photograph that captured a moment from years ago. Something sweet and sentimental? Something humorous and or revealing? Explore the photograph, and what it evokes in you today through your write.
Here’s what I wrote for Prompt 19 which suggested you write a Gripe or complaint poem.

Not A Complaint Poem
by Christopher J. Jarmick

I could complain
’bout hypocrites, politics,
bad drivers, high prices
dumb movies, TV,
lousy music, damn kids

enough to make you insane
but I’ll restrain myself
and not complain.

Just 25 bucks
By Christopher J. Jarmick

Dishwasher’s definitely broke.
It’s something rarely seen
with this superior brand of machine
But not cheaper to keep her
Repair almost as much as new one.
How much do I owe you?
“Well you save 25 bucks with that coupon
So just 50 bucks today.
Sorry for the bad news
But it could have been worse
Saved 25 bucks!”

Price compare
New Consumer Reports approved best buy.
Appliance store sales clerk
seems like a nice enough guy.
Model you want is on sale – no joke
And Easy no interest 18 month financing
means you won’t be flat broke
More good news, he tells me, is on the way
Probably won’t get a bill at all for 60 days!

But the bill arrives a week after new washer
with minimum payment
25 bucks
due in 10 days.
But just my fate
Though I send it off in a week
But they claim it was processed a day too late
So they charge 25 bucks.
25 bucks? Is this my fate?
$25 bucks?
Okay only 25 bucks, what’s 25 bucks
No big deal this 25 bucks… but hey wait wait
This ain’t right.
Minimum payments is just 25 bucks,
But a day late and it’s another 25 bucks

Just 25 bucks, no big deal 25 bucks
Only 25 bucks, what’s 25 bucks.

I wonder if it’s a scam
How many pay it
But the salesman said
I wouldn’t get the bill right away.
He shouldn’t have said that
But he did say that
How do we know he really said that.
Does it seem fair that I had less than two weeks
to start paying this bill
Not anything we can do
Should I really pay this
And feel angry and blue?
Just 25 bucks, no big deal 25 bucks
Only 25 bucks, what’s 25 bucks.

Cop pulls me over
Says my brake light is out
Should I moan and shout?
Just got my car back from the garage
600 bucks I lost
And now another
New repair cost.
“License and registration
and proof of insurance please.”
Smile nice, Chris
Don’t share your consternation
“This insurance card expired last week.”
I hand over another,
Not the one I seek
It’s even older so I hand him a statement
Counting on at least some good will
But he shakes his head,
“That’s not proof, just a bill.
I’ll be right back.”

10 minutes later there’s a ticket.
“Not giving you one for the brake light
That wouldn’t be right
But I wrote you up for not having insurance
Might cost you 550 bucks
But you won’t have to pay
Don’t worry.”

“What’s that you say?”
“Show the courthouse clerk
you have current insurance
and aren’t some irresponsible jerk
and all will be good.”
“550 bucks would give me a fright
So,l thanks I suppose.”
“Yep have a good night.”

One week goes by
My time does fly
I drive to the courthouse
Park for free
There’s a clerk
I need to see. . .
“Officer said this will be dismissed
little more than a canard
and I won’t to have to pay
long as I show you my insurance card.”
“That is correct
Ticket is dismissed,
you won’t have to pay
except a 25 dollar administration fee!”

“What’s that you say. . .
25 bucks?”
“Yes, the administration fee”
I see.
I didn’t commit a crime
I drive across town
wasting my free time
to handle this minor infraction.
I could get angry and blue
but that’s not the best thing to do;
Hell… it’s
just 25 bucks, no big deal 25 bucks
only 25 bucks, what’s 25 bucks.

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

Keep writing!!!

Read more about National Poetry Month 2014 and NaPoWrimo in my 3 Part Series here:

The root of the word Poetry is from the Greek ποιέω (poieō), “‘I
make’”). , poiesis, meaning a “making” or ‘creation’

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=–=-=-

Poetry is Everything

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NaPoWriMo National Poetry Writing Month Day 19 Prompt for Saturday April 19, 2014 Posted April 18, 2014

April 18, 2014

“Poetry is the rhythmical creation of beauty in words.”
Edgar Allan Poe

Welcome to Day 19 of the NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month) challenge. Have you been able to write 18 poems? Congratulations… keep up the great work. If you haven’t written a poem every day, you can set a goal to write 11 poems in the next 11 days. Believe me setting a goal and following through and reaching it builds self-confidence and makes you feel better about yourself. You put your mind and a little time toward it and you can get it done. Try it.

Now for today’s prompt.

Saturday April 19th Prompt

Prompt 19 – Write a Gripe Poem

 
What’s been bugging you later? What’s getting on your nerves? . If you have a little nit that’s about to blister, or your mad as hell, it’s time to yell… well in a poem anyway. Time to air your gripe, your complaint… but you’ll have to do it in a poem, and if turns out to be a rhyming, sing-song sort of poem well that’s even better.

PROMPT 18 – suggested you write an Acrostic Poem.
Here’s what I came up with:

Poem Starter 1418
By Christopher J. Jarmick

Short sayings
Have greater impact more
Often than not.

Rather than repeat
Try to write more concisely.

(Notes: 1. The first letter of each line spells out SHORT. 2. There’s a touch of sarcasm here—the word MORE is unnecessary making the short poem LESS concise than it could be. For that matter, the phrase ‘more often than not’ is also in the strictest sense not necessary and rather cliché and trite – - though it does get me to the letter O in the third line. I don’t usually comment on my writings like this, but NaPoWriMo attracts poets and writers of all different types and sometimes a little teaching is a good thing.)

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

Waits
By Christopher J. Jarmick

Troubadour
Of the highest order
Mimics diverse musical styles

With unique, clever twists
And distinctive voice
Inhabiting various personas
Timeless quirky inventive
Singer songwriter soars above most.

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

THIS IS JUST TO SAY
By Christopher J. Jarmick

This is just to say
He knew
It was wrong
Stealing the fruit from the

Icebox.
Still he

Just couldn’t resist the
Unexpected temptation the
Sweet plums offered
Torturing his senses with

Tantalizing promise of culinary delight.
Of course once his palate was

Satiated he felt remorse
And a bit of guilt leading him to write
Yet another poem.

(This Is Just To Say is spelled out in the first letter of each line of this poem which is a tribute to the one of my favorite poems by one of my favorite poets, William Carlos Williams entitled This is Just to Say, which if you don’t know it, I encourage you to google it right now and enjoy it. It is a very short memorable poem.) Oh okay… Click here to read: THIS IS JUST TO SAY http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15535

Keep writing!!!
Read more about National Poetry Month 2014 and NaPoWrimo in my 3 Part Series here:

The root of the word Poetry is from the Greek ποιέω (poieō), “‘I
make’”). , poiesis, meaning a “making” or ‘creation’

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=–=-=-

Poetry is Everything

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NaPoWriMo National Poetry Writing Month Day 18 Prompt for Friday April 18, 2014 Posted April 17, 2014

April 17, 2014

“Poetry is just the evidence of life. If your life is burning well, poetry is just the ash.”
― Leonard Cohen

Welcome to Day 18 of the NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month) challenge. I hope you are continuing to participate and you are enjoying learning more about yourself and the process of writing through the regular writing of daily poems. Keep writing.

Now for today’s prompt.

Friday April 18th Prompt

PROMPT 18 – Acrostic Poem

Relatively simple acrostics may merely spell out the letters of the alphabet in order; such an acrostic may be called an ‘alphabetical acrostic’ or Abecedarius.

Acrostic poetry was very common in medieval literature and often served to highlight the name of the poet or the patron who paid him. They were also used to make a prayer to a saint. You’ll find alphabet acrostic poems which are called Abecedarius poems in the first four of the five songs that make up the the Book of Lamentations. They praise the good wife in Proverbs. There are many Acrostic Psalms, the most notable is the very long Psalm 119 where each section is named after the letters of the Hebrew alphabet.

In Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass, the final chapter “A Boat, Beneath A Sunny Sky” is an acrostic of the real Alice’s name: Alice Pleasance Liddell. (Good trivia question to ask: What’s Alice’s full name….).

The Poem begins….

A boat, beneath a sunny sky
Lingering onward dreamily
In an evening of July -

Children three that nestle near,
Eager eye and willing ear,

. . . and the poem continues from there. See how the first letters of each line going down spells Alice here?)

So you’re assignment, NaPoWriMer is to write an acrostic poem, wherein the first letter of each line spells out a word (at least 6 letters long), a name or a short phrase (any number of lines is okay). Extra points if the poem relates in some way to the word/ words or name you spell out. Have fun!!!

I wrote several poems for the NaPoWriMo 17 prompt which was
HANDS

Poem Starter 1417
By Christopher J. Jarmick

Gotta hand it you!
Thumbs up, good job!
Make it official and shake on it.
Remember, she is pretty
But he is HANDsome!

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

In Praise of Hands
By Christopher J. Jarmick

27 bones
to hold
(54 together)
to take for granted
until they hurt
or don’t quite work
like they used too.

Knuckles to pop,
pads to get dirty,
or for musicians/workmen
to grow callouses on.
They grab,
Hold knives,
Spoons,
keep count
and touch.
Feel how smooth and cool
the imported polished marble,
or how warm a partner’s skin is.
We can wave, curse or
sign messages to each other.

We can make noise,
demonstrate approval,
defend or attack
with split second notice.
They can catch delicate objects
Before the break,
prevent serious injuries,
and we can use them to
score points or
to stop others from
reaching their goals.

In a way they
see in the dark,
talk without speech
communicate comfort , passion
or anger.

AND
with a tender gentle squeeze
they signify the deepest emotion of all:
Love.

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

Hand Jive
By Christopher J. Jarmick

Mute feeler of texture, temperature
Delicate, tender one moment
then folded into lethal
battering ram the next.
Later, an efficient assistant
in transforming thoughts into
language onto paper and
digital screens.
(digital… interesting choice of word there hmmmm…)

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

Keep writing!!!

Read more about National Poetry Month 2014 and NaPoWrimo in my 3 Part Series here:

The root of the word Poetry is from the Greek ποιέω (poieō), “‘I
make’”). , poiesis, meaning a “making” or ‘creation’

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=–=-=-

Poetry is Everything

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NaPoWriMo National Poetry Writing Month Day 17 Prompt for Thursday April 17, 2014 Posted April 16, 2014

April 16, 2014

“Every heart sings a song, incomplete, until another heart whispers back. Those who wish to sing always find a song. At the touch of a lover, everyone becomes a poet.”
― Plato

Welcome to Day 17 of the NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month) challenge. Some of the participants hit a wall around this point of time. It gets a little more difficult to write a poem, or to write from a prompt. Finding the time remains a challenge for some, but since you’ve hopefully carved out a little time to write every day, the problem is that perhaps you feel the pressure a little more and want to write something that has some quality to it. Worry not NaPoWriMer write and the rewards for your efforts will manifest, if not today, than soon. Keep writing.

Now for today’s prompt.

Wednesday April 17th Prompt

PROMPT 17 – Hands

Write a poem that is inspired by Hands. Think of your sense of touch, your fingers, your palm, about what your hands or the hands of others (holding hands, high fiving, massage,) means to you. Think perhaps of someone who has last a hand or both hands or was born without hands. Write a poem about this.

PROMPT 16 suggested you write a Poetic Toast.
I went a bit over-board and wrote several things for this prompt.

Poem starter 1416
By Christopher J. Jarmick

Here’s to the curse that’s made me a writer
enduring grueling, long hours of
arduous mental hard labor
only another afflicted wordsmith
truly understands but are too busy
inside their own heads to actually give a damn.

A POETIC TOAST
By Christopher J. Jarmick

Strip yer muse naked
Yer wordz aren’t that sacred
Later drive yersef daft
Workin on yer craft
Quit your belly achin’
NaPo taint fakin’
Now write em on down
And spread em aroun’

Jack McCarthy Toast
By Christopher J. Jarmick

Jack you figured out late in life
how to win our hearts with a
perfect balance of wit, irreverence
humor, and pathos even as you fiercely trounced
friends and strangers at poetry competitions.
You shared many a secret
right on your sleeve.
offered sage advice,
opened your life struggles,
with uncommon truths
and humility.
You made us laugh, then twisted
it to make us cry
And no matter how we resisted
what we knew was happening,
even as we knew it was happening,
It was impossible not to be
moved by the words, your tone,
the pauses you took between
the lines.
You were the best,
Damn it

And you gave everything you could
until your last breath
leaving us wanting more.
One in a million,
we’ll swig something
non-alcohlic to honor
the memories we have of
you, and encourage those
who haven’t yet had the pleasure,
to discover what you’ve left
behind.

NAPOWRIMO TOAST
By Christopher J. Jarmick

To NaPoWriMo
An excuse to write
in plain sight
to deviously
but obviously
trick the muse
to free her noose
ignore this mock
on writer’s block
and allow a poem
(or two)
to find a home.

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

Keep writing!!!

Read more about National Poetry Month 2014 and NaPoWrimo in my 3 Part Series here:

The root of the word Poetry is from the Greek ποιέω (poieō), “‘I
make’”). , poiesis, meaning a “making” or ‘creation’

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=–=-=-

Poetry is Everything

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NaPoWriMo National Poetry Writing Month Day 16 Prompt for Wednesday April 16, 2014 Posted April 15, 2014

April 15, 2014

May the road rise to meet you.
May the wind be always at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face.
And rains fall soft upon your fields.
And until we meet again,
May God hold you in the hollow of His hand.
And may ye be in heaven a half-hour
Afore the devil knows ye’re dead!

- – -+Traditional Irish Toast

Welcome to Day 16 of the NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month) challenge. A toast like the one above is in order for all of you who are making an effort to write a +poem-a-day . Jump right on in and start writing your poems, or if you missed a few days, get back on the proverbial horse and start riding again.

Now for today’s prompt.

Wednesday April 16th Prompt

PROMPT 16 – Write a Poetic Toast

A poet I know, Brendan McBreen, reminded me recently that one of the best Northwest Poets Jack McCarthy once advised that all poets should write a Toast or two. The Toast is sort of a lost art these days, but used to be far more interesting and creative than simply raising a glass and saying here’s to…the bride and groom. Toasts which were sometimes also ‘roasts’ honored a special guest or a special occasion. So let’s write a toast or two (at least 4 lines) to a person or thing you have never toasted/roasted before.

(Notes: Brendan McBreen is a poet from Auburn, Washington, a member of Striped Water Poets who is currently studying abroad in Australia and sometimes writes in his blog Elsewhere in the Rain. Normally he would be participating in NaPoWriMo but his intense studies prevent it this year, though he has a goal of writing 100 poems in 100 different forms before the end of the year.)

Jack McCarthy was a dear friend and an incredible beloved poet who passed in January of 2013. Jack McCarthy website. 

HERES WHAT I WROTE FOR PROMPT 15 – Create a cross-out / erasure Found poem. I wrote two from the same text as you shall see.

Billy Graham’s 1958 Sermon: What’s Wrong with the World Abridged in an Poem
by Christopher J. Jarmick

I have been sinful .There is wickedness,
adulteries,murders, an evil eye, blasphemy,
terribly wrong racial tension,war , crime
We are basically unhappy, we’re facing problems:
within ourselves, with money. You cannot
control human nature. Man has a disease called Sin.
All vile things from within ( greed, deceipt, lies,)
put all together produce war, poverty and sin.
Bible describes sin as a free being
rebelling against God, transgression against conscience;
every one is guilty, responsible.
Don’t blame Adam! Bible says you have evil thoughts too
You cheated, told lie deliberately.
Jesus said evils devour the society.
Problems of world not social, not poverty, but sin.
Sin means failure. No remedy for it.
God says I’ll bury them all in the depths of the seas .
Tonight give life to Christ. God will help you.

 

Alternate Version of Billy Grahams 1958 Sermon
By Christopher J. Jarmick

What’s Wrong with Sin? America is bored.
Within ourselves we find peace and relaxation too.
Bible teaches sin, Ladies, Gentlemen
put evil things together and man will be happy.
Vile wickedness comes from inside the man.
Build utopia. God did want man to sin and lie.
We are all sinners. God doesn’t see us.
Weakness of God, stronger than the foolishness of man.
Confused? Mixed up? I’d like to shake you up.
People work hard for sin. Rebel. Ask- What’s Wrong with sin?

(Billy Graham’s sermon in text is nearly 5000 words. I created the Cliff Notes/Abridged version in this poem version of it and the alternate version. I used alternating 10 and 13 line syllables.)

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

Keep writing!!!

Read more about National Poetry Month 2014 and NaPoWrimo in my 3 Part Series here:

The root of the word Poetry is from the Greek ποιέω (poieō), “‘I
make’”). , poiesis, meaning a “making” or ‘creation’

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=–=-=-

Poetry is Everything

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NaPoWriMo National Poetry Writing Month Day 15 Prompt for Tuesday April 15, 2014 Posted April 14, 2014

April 14, 2014

“I act as the tongue of you,
… tied in your mouth
. . . . in mine it begins to be loosened.”
― Walt Whitman

Welcome to Day 15 of the NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month) challenge. We are half-way through the challenge of writing 30 poems in 30 days. If you want to jump in right now… and write 15 poems in 15 days. . . let me encourage you to do so.

Now for today’s prompt.

Tuesday April 15th Prompt

Prompt 15 – Create a Cross-Out aka Erasure FOUND Poem

The cross out or rub out/erasure poem is a type of FOUND poem using existing material. You will be crossing out words you don’t want in your poem from another source. Here’s what I’d like you to try to do.

Take a newspaper, magazine article or piece of text (I’d suggest of several thousand words in length) or an internet version of such. Do not change the order of any of the words when you create your poem. In other words you could look at the previous sentence (Do not change….) and create; DO THE CHANGE THE WORDS but you should not make this sentence: CREATE THE ORDER OF WORDS (because you’ve changed the order of the words as they originally appear).

 
In each line your new poem should include two words or three words that have been kept together exactly as they appeared in the original article but do not use more than THREE WORDS in a row as they originally appeared. In my example ‘the words’ appeared in the original text and in the new line of the poem. You may not change the words in any way to ‘make them fit’. Don’t make something plural or past tense. You use what is there and create something different with it. You do not have to keep the same idea or theme as the original (but you can keep it the same if you really want to). The text is simply a bunch of words that you are re-using to create your poem.

Your poem should be at least 6 lines long. And it should be somewhat poetic. (you can add some additional rules if you would like: Have a consistent pattern regarding the number of syllables in your lines – every line is 10 or 12 syllables. Or line 1 is 10 syllables, lines two is 12, line 3 is 10, line 4 is 12 etc. You can rhyme the first and second or first and third lines and the last lines in similar fashion.

Remember you are creating something poetic with your cross-out/erasure found poem.)

Have fun!

Here’s what I wrote for prompt 14. (I added an extra couplet as an update…)

Prompt 14 was to write a Ghazal, a popular Arabic form of poetry. The rules were in yesterday’s post.

Monday LaConner Ghazal
By Christopher J. Jarmick

Newspapers, politics more doom and gloom
I wonder will the tulips be in bloom?

Sunny day, road trip a few hours away;
La Conner. Will the tulips be in bloom?

Mini-vacation, a leisurely day
Sun shines, but will the tulips be in bloom?

Special lunch planned and some antique shopping
I wonder will the tulips be in bloom?

Acres upon acres of flower farms
I don’t know if tulips will be in bloom.

You will have to wait, until I return
to know if the tulips were all in bloom.

Reds, yellows, dark purple, black, white and more
Chris dreams that the tulips were all in bloom.

It is evening and I have returned home
Chris can report: tulips were all in bloom

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

Keep writing!!!

Read more about National Poetry Month 2014 and NaPoWrimo in my 3 Part Series here:

 

The root of the word Poetry is from the Greek ποιέω (poieō), “‘I
make’”). , poiesis, meaning a “making” or ‘creation’

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=–=-=-

Poetry is Everything

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NaPoWriMo National Poetry Writing Month Day 14 Prompt for Monday April 14, 2014 Posted April 13, 2014

April 13, 2014

“Poetry is an act of peace. Peace goes into the making of a poet as flour goes into the making of bread.”
Pablo Neruda

Welcome to Day 14 of the NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month) challenge. We are almost at the half-way point of writing 30 poems in 30 days. How are you doing?

Now for today’s prompt.

Monday April 14th Prompt

PROMPT 14 – Write a Ghazal (pronounced Guzzle with a bit of an Arabic G sound).

What’s a Ghazal?

It’s an Arabic verse form popularized by European poets of the 19th century (particularly German poets) and first became popular in the U.S. in the 1960s.

Rules:

All lines must have the same number of syllables. You don’t have to settle for iambic pentameter (duh-DUH-duh-DUH-duh-DUH-duh-DUH-duh-DUH ) or ten syllables but that’s pretty common for this form.
It is written in couplets (two lines, space, two lines etc). There should be a minimum of 5 couplets (ten line minimum).

The first couplet rhymes

Example:
The first couplet of the Ghazal must rhyme
Pretty easy to do most of the time.

The closing words of the end of the second line are repeated in the second part of the second lines of each succeeding couplets. This is called the ’ radif ‘
(in the example above : most of the time or… of the time must be end every other line of the poem.

You don’t have to rhyme the other couplets. You can shift subjects and tones but you come back to the radif (of the time or most of the time) at the end of each couplet.

The poets signature (nickname, first name or last name) must appear somewhere in the last couplet (last two lines before the repeated radif which ends the poem.

The ghazal is an easy stylized form to learn and use because it has rules but there’s room to create a freer more wide open type of poem than most forms offer, plus you put your name/signature on it.

Now have fun writing a Ghazal!

The 13th Prompt asked you to capture a bit or two of a dead poets’ life and work it into a poem

Here’s what I did.

Plath
By Christopher J. Jarmick

Burn the ashes of all the peripherals.
Were you the sad Hamlet with a knife
clutching the voice of Daddy
too tight
as you ran from the halls of ossified discipline
and dangerous tidiness
and splattered into collages of
depression?

Let’s pretend we had insight
knew it was a bad marriage;
realized the death wish Rosenberg
obsession was a clue.
Understood the necessity of digging
deeper into madness
in long, long scream
of taboo subjects.
How far down,
down
do you pursue grief,
through narcissistic
sculpture gardens?

Lady Lazarus;
dying is an art. . .
some get all of the promised 9 practice feline runs
but alas
not you.
Not you.

(Several Sylvia Plath line snippets and quotes and a few that are altered slightly, make up the majority of this poem).

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

Keep writing!!!

Read more about National Poetry Month 2014 and NaPoWrimo in my 3 Part Series here:

The root of the word Poetry is from the Greek ποιέω (poieō), “‘I
make’”). , poiesis, meaning a “making” or ‘creation’

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=–=-=-

Poetry is Everything

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

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NaPoWriMo National Poetry Writing Month Day 13 Prompt for Sunday April 13, 2014 Posted April 12, 2014

April 12, 2014

“See with your soul and not your eyes
because to dance with the beasts you
must penetrate their disguise.”
― P.C. Cast

Welcome to Day 13 of the NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month) challenge. If you are not participating, but are about to test the waters with your toe. . . it’s time to jump in. If you’ve missed a few days. . . so what, do a cannonball and write a poem a day for the rest of the month. If you have little practice or confidence in your abilities . . . the act of doing it counts. . . later you can revise and edit your scribbles into something better.

Now for today’s prompt.

The suggested prompt for Sunday April 13

Prompt: Recognize/Honor a Dead Poet in a poem.

Capture a bit or two of a dead poets’ life and work it into a poem. Perhaps pick a poet you who isn’t one of your all-time favorites, but one who is esteemed by others, perhaps respected by you but a poet you might say: I wish I liked/enjoyed that poet more than I do. . . . Learn something new about the poet you choose (keep looking until you find something new about the poet you didn’t know before, and if you find it right away… take a little MORE time exploring some of the poets’ work/ poems, perhaps interviews the poet wrote or shared about writing poetry if any exist. If the poem is a bit experimental, let it come out that way and see what happens. Title your poem with the last name of the poet you chose.

The prompt for the 12th day of NaPoWriMo took us to the movies. I suggested your reference 3 to 5 or even more your favorite top 10 movies in an unusual manner within a poem. And then let us know what you referenced at the end.

Here’s what I wrote…

Poem Starter 1412.5
by Christopher J. Jarmick

Don’t alienate your friends
in the process of seizing your day.
Power in a vacuum , no matter
what your wealth is Hell on earth.
Best to try to do the right thing
no matter whose
side your on.

(references Harold and Maude, Citizen Kane, Godfather 2 and Chinatown).

Rosebuds
By Christopher J. Jarmick

Behind the burgundy velvet
curtain, the naïve mid-western
girl provided the voice for the
narcissistic glamorous movie star
who refused to accept that her
destiny was about to change.
Change is as unstoppable as
time.

Seeds of good are planted
within the worst,
and out of tragedy
the Phoenix rises
but there’s also bad
within the best of intentions.

The ends can never justify selfish means
despite what the devil convinces you is true.
Love, brotherhood of man,
honor among thieves, all proof
there are always unlocked doors
offering access to redemption even
in the worst of times.
Miracles are often perfectly
timed coincidences that put
people in the right place at the right
time.

Mysteries are solved,
answers are received
but there aren’t always
going to be happy endings.

(Singing in the Rain, The Wild Bunch, Godfather 2, The Long Goodbye, Harold and Maude, Citizen Kane and Chinatown are all in this one.)

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

Keep writing!!!

Read more about National Poetry Month 2014 and NaPoWrimo in my 3 Part Series here:

The root of the word Poetry is from the Greek ποιέω (poieō), “‘I
make’”). , poiesis, meaning a “making” or ‘creation’

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Poetry is Everything

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NaPoWriMo National Poetry Writing Month Day 12 Prompt for Saturday April 12, 2014 Posted April 11, 2014

April 11, 2014

“The difference between the poet and the mathematician is that the poet tries to get his head into the heavens while the mathematician tries to get the heavens into his head.”
G.K. Chesterton

 

Welcome to Day 12 of the NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month) challenge. As we get closer to the half-way mark, I encourage your efforts to make time to write a poem every day and have the confidence that the effort will reveal something about the writing process that you’ll benefit from, if not immediately, then in the near future. You learn craft by doing and participating.

The April 12th prompt.

Prompt: Favorite Movies

My obsession with movies leads to 12th day of NaPoWriMo birthday prompt. This year, let’s reference 3 to 5 of your favorite 10 movie in an unusual manner within a poem. At the end, let us know which movies you referenced in the poem—particularly important if your write is a bit mysterious and less obvious.

Yesterday’s Prompt 11 was to use at least 4 of 6 specific unusual
words in a poem.

Making a More Perfect World
By Christopher J. Jarmick

The fritillaries flittered about the
sculptured hedges
of the tasteful English garden
and proper tea was
served as euphonious music
from a classical string quartet
was played as if the world had been
had been transformed into
an anondynian, conflict free
politically correct heaven.
Cue the mise en abyme;
Anitpodes; he a brash young
New York stand-up comic, she a shoot from
the hip Australian filmmaker
whose love at first sight passion
raised the prurient ires of
the Bishop’s wife.
Before long, the serene mood
turned sour, a hornets nest of
vicious gossip fueled the jealousy of
the righteously intolerant.
But the antipodes were
already in procreation rehearsals
in a secret spot hidden within
the topiary maze.

I used all 6 prompt words: 1. euphonious (pleasing to the ear); 2. mise en abyme (French meez-ahn-ah-beem –placed in an abyss ); 3. prurient –( an unwanted arousal or interest in sex); 4. anodyne (unlikely to offend or upset anyone); 5. antipodes (diametrically opposite sides of the earth as in Australia to U.S. ); 6. fritillaries (type of butterfly).

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

Keep writing!!!

Read more about National Poetry Month 2014 and NaPoWrimo in my 3 Part Series here:

The root of the word Poetry is from the Greek ποιέω (poieō), “‘I
make’”). , poiesis, meaning a “making” or ‘creation’

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=–=-=-

Poetry is Everything

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

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NaPoWriMo National Poetry Writing Month Day 11 Prompt for Friday April 11, 2014 Posted April 10, 2014

April 10, 2014

“A poet’s autobiography is his poetry. Anything else is just a footnote.”
― Yevgeny Yevtushenko

Welcome to Day 11 of the NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month) challenge. One third of the challenge and poetry month is behind us now. If you are just getting started I hope you’ll set a goal to write 20 poems in the next 20 days.

FRIDAY APRIL 11TH Prompt

Prompt: Use 4 or more of these words in a poem: 1. euphonious (pleasing to the ear); 2. mise en abyme (French meez-ahn-ah-beem –placed in an abyss ); 3. prurient –( an unwanted arousal or interest in sex (or violence or?) an itch, craving); 4. anodyne (unlikely to offend or upset anyone); 5. antipodes (diametrically opposite sides of the earth as in Australia to U.S.); 6. fritillaries (butterlies that are usually orange with black spots on the upper sides of the wings and silver spooted on the underside of the hind wing; also Scarlet and White wildflowers in the NorthWest).

Your poem should be a minimum of 4 lines and include at least 4 of these words. Have at it!

Here’s what I wrote for yesterday’s prompt.

April 10 prompt suggested writing an ‘inappropriate poem’ but in a restrained, PG or PG-13 manner.

Poem Starter 1410
By Christopher J. Jarmick

Thank God,
I can blame Satan
for these twisted thoughts that whisper in my head
at utterly inappropriate moments.

 

Birds at the Strip Club
By Christopher J. Jarmick

About a hundred yards away I spy a ungraceful
chaotic movement of a bird in a flight.
Normally I equate bird flight with grace
But this movement is
A Three Stooges spastic slapstick version of
Bird flight.
I realize there are two birds.
Sex or an attempt must be occurring.
It is early Spring.
If it were teenagers,
I’d be in grumpy old man on the porch mode.
Hey… STOP THAT!
But this is nature!
It is supposed to be this way.
There is no passionate desire here
for the procreating fowl
but I imagine a burning, painful need
to DO IT and be done with it
and get on with life.

And suddenly my mind wanders
making a connection out of thin air
that doesn’t really connect at all.
The bird is obligated to procreate
Because body triggers are forcing it to happen.
There is a system, a logic, a purpose here.
And then there are men. . .
Human males
who frequent strip clubs
in enough numbers
to make them profitable businesses.

I imagine two crows on a wire
being able to observe and comment
about human males flocking to a strip joint.
“Ridiculous behavior” say Crow number 1.
“Do they really think they will get ‘Lucky’?” says Crow number 2.
“I understand most of the females who entice them aren’t even interested in men and certainly not in having sex with any of the customers. Squawks Crow number 1.
“It’s about money. . .whatever that is.”

And before long more crows arrive, cackling and laughing at the
ridiculous spectacle.
“That’s another regular, see how he seems a little nervous about someone seeing him
getting out of his car?”
“Probably married,” says Crow 2.
And that sets off another huge burst of laughter.

Copyright© Christopher J. Jarmick 2014

Keep writing!!!

Read more about National Poetry Month 2014 and NaPoWrimo in my 3 Part Series here:

The root of the word Poetry is from the Greek ποιέω (poieō), “‘I
make’”). , poiesis, meaning a “making” or ‘creation’

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=–=-=-

Poetry is Everything

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