Posts Tagged ‘challenge’

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NaPoWriMo Prompts April 4 to 7 and Prompt poems too!

April 3, 2019

“Words are our most inexhaustible source of magic.” J. K. Rowling.

Here are suggested prompt for the next 4 days.  Use the one for April 4th to write your poem on April 4th.  Remember to write a poem each and every day.  If you only have 30 minutes to write…  write what you can in that time.  We are writing first (not final) draughts.  This is a challenge, an exercise, a way to begin a new habit of writing each and every day.

“A professional writer is an amateur who didn’t quit.” –  Richard Bach

Prompt for April 4 (write poem this prompt on April 4th)

Words inside of words creating other words.  The Anagram.  Put your name into an Anagram generator like this one   Use several of the generated words in a poem that is not quite about yourself but has some autobiographical things in it.  In other words.. you are buried within the poem using words generated from you name (but not your name and not completely a self-portrait poem).  Remember the prompts are meant to be an inspirational challenge – there is no right or wrong way to ‘follow the rules’ of a prompt.

“Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” – –Anton Chekhov

Prompt for April 5   (write poem to this prompt on April 5th  ) From Brendan McBreen

“Don’t forget— no one else sees the word the way you do, so no one else can tell the stories you have to tell.” – –Charles de Lint

look up

write a poem which includes seven references to falling.

“Start writing, no matter what. The water does not flow until the faucet is turned on.” Louis L’Amour

Prompt for April 6   (write poem to this prompt on April 6th  )

 “This is how you do it; you sit down at the keyboard and you put one word after another until it’s done. It’s that easy, and that hard.” – – Neil Gaiman

You know how they have all these interesting names for paint colors?  First create some odd combinations of words for colors   salsa red probably exists but angst auger for example would be a unique one.  Create 3 to 5 of these and then use them in a poem.

“Your intuition knows what to write, so get out of the way.”  – – Ray Bradbury

Prompt for April  7   (write poem to this prompt on April  7th )

“The only writer to whom you should compare yourself is the writer you were yesterday.”  – – David Schlosser

And on the seventh day, we concentrate on the seven line poetry form known as the Septolet.  Write two or more Septolets!   Suggest you write a formal and informal Septolet.

“Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.”Pablo Picasso

Write two different types of Septolets today.  (Sep-toe-lay) 1- 7 lines 16 syllables  2- 14 words – 7 lines.

Septolet 1 Formal: Line 1 has one syllable, Line 2 has two, Line 3 has 3, Line 4 has 4 syllables, space, Line 5 has 3, Line 6 has 2, Line 7 has one syllable. Poem should relate to one thought, feeling, object, place.

Septolet 2 Informal: Total of 14 words in 7 lines, no line should have more than three words. The poem should relate to one subject, object, thought or feeling. The first four lines create a coherent picture or thought, the last three lines create another. Each could stand separately, but both are related.

Examples:

Formal Syllable Septolet                                          Informal Word Septolet

 

One                           1 syllable                                    “This

Second                        2 syllables                                    is easy

Or perhaps                 3 syllables                                 anyone can do

Four ticking bombs   4 syllables                                it,”

 

Blank space

 

Reminder                  3 syllables                                said

That you’re               2 syllables                                tightrope walker.

Late                              1 syllable                               “but don’t look down!”

 

The example on the left side is the more formal syllable Septolet.  The one on the right is made up of 14 words. (You don’t count syllables).  4 word maximum on one line.

 

ORIGIN

The origin of the Septolet –a French form is not completely known. It’s most likely origin is based in music since a septuplet is a group of seven notes played in a very specific way. It’s a member of the musical tuplet family—the most common one in use: the triplet. The septuplets (septolets or septimoles) usually indicate 7 notes in the duration of 4—or in compound meter 7 for 6—but may sometimes be used to mean 7 notes in the duration of 8.

In the poetic form however meter is not required so the music connection is perhaps NOT correct. The form has evolved as a sort of European/American Haiku . The more formal version is with syllables, the less formal derivation (American) is with words of any syllable length. 7 lines broken into two stanzas. The first stanza is 4 lines. Then a blank line. Then three more lines. The formal version uses 14 syllables, the informal version uses 14 words. You can order the words 1, 2,3,3, BREAK 2, 2, 1 if you would like or you can simply use a total of 14 words with some lines having up to three words and others having one or all lines having two words.

The writer is by nature a dreamer— a conscious dreamer.”  — Carson McCullers

Keep Writing!

PROMPT POEMS I’ve written for April 1, April 2 and Today!

April 1 poem using Shakespeare quotes

Inside a pickle

By Christopher J. Jarmick

All of a sudden, as good luck would have it,

a NapoWriMo spell was spoke:

Eye of newt, and toe of frog,

wool of bat, and tongue of dog,

adder’s fork, and blind-worm’s sting,

lizard’s leg, and owlet’s wing,

adverb and semi-colon

double toil and trouble;

fire burn, and caldron bubble.

And I found myself in a pickle.

Though this be madness, truth will out

and thereby hangs a tale.

Woe is me as a pickle under the greenwood tree.

While you live, tell truth and shame the devil

the game is up and I suffer the crack of doom,

the be all and end all

as a pickle.

Son of a bitch!

Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.

I have not slept one wink,

a victim of foul play

at one fell swoop,

a sorry sight

Brevity is the soul of wit

so I will fight fire with fire

for ever and a day

inside a pickle under the greenwood tree.

April 2nd ‘opposite’ prompt

A line by line ‘opposite’ poem of #20 (aka the Pennycandystore Beyond the El by Lawrence Felinghetti from Coney Island of the Mind)

 

Etisoppo 02#

Yb

kcimraJ .J rehpotsirhC

 

Too late!  Too Late!

They laughed.

Inside the seeds were jumping

His knees were inhaling in the great room

His feet were dry

A man walked out

The moon had sucked up the wind

inside those seeds were jumping as they came to life

And celery

And carrot cake

And broccoli stones

slept beneath the still dog,

on that June early morn.

Peanut butter darkened with complete optimism

in reality

rising with hate

The last lost

sour forest below the mountain.

 

April 3 prompt – “three in a row.”

THREED AT LAST

By Christopher J. Jarmick

“Government of the people, by the people, for the people.” — Abraham Lincoln

 

Three times three cubed

Abraham learned the cipher:

for three is to nine as two is to six.

 

Tell me and I may forget, teach me and I will remember

But involve me and I will learn and when I learn, and earn

and yearn, I shall have a happy life.

 

Three times tempted

Three times the cock crows

Three times denied

 

The rule of the Three-fold law

Says whatever you put out there will be returned to you three times.

The truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth

 

The trinity, the trilogy,

the magic of three

the curse of three

 

You can survive three weeks without food.

three days without water

three minutes without air

 

My Three Sons

The Three Musketeers

Three Billy Goats Gruff,

 

Three Little Pigs,

Three Faces of Eve,

The Third Man.

 

Rule of thirds, triad

My three siblings

My three daughters

 

Veni, vidi, vici!

Click your heels together three times.

Three times the charm.

 

Three, two,

One,

write.

KEEP WRITING!

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NaPoWriMo 30/30 April 28, 2018

April 27, 2018

“Writers are the exorcists of their own demons.” ― Mario Vargas Llosa

NaPoWriMo Day 28, 2018

“A story was a form of telepathy. By means of inking symbols onto a page, she was able to send thoughts and feelings from her mind to her reader’s. It was a magical process, so commonplace that no one stopped to wonder at it.” ― Ian McEwan

And then there were three…..  Three prompts left for NaPoWriMo 2018.  Today is Independent Bookstore Day.  Support an independent book seller or three today.

“I am irritated by my own writing. I am like a violinist whose ear is true, but whose fingers refuse to reproduce precisely the sound he hears within.” ― Gustave Flaubert

NaPoWriMo – 30/30 –  Poem-a-Day prompt for April 28, 2018

Get a list of the Best Selling Non Fiction Books (New York Times or Local Area best-sellers)   Use two titles as they are in your poem and use as many of the words from the titles as you possibly can in the construction of your poem.

Celebrate Independent Book Store Day   Visit and support your friendly neighborhood indie bookstore Saturday April 28th!  BookTree’s Event Page Here 

Keep Writing

“Writing is the only thing that when I do it, I don’t feel I should be doing something else.” ― Gloria Steinem

Poem for Prompt 27  –  Graffiti inspired poem!    (Poem 26 tomorrow… I goofed and posted this one early…. oh well… it’s indie bookstore day and I am juggling like crazy!

Mr. Kilroy, I presume?

By Christopher J. Jarmick

 

He was here, there and everywhere;

not some Fool on the Hill, or  flash-in-the-pan fad toy;

even found his way inside sealed ship compartments

nearly 90 years – a doodle and the name Kilroy.

 

Bald or mostly bald man, large nose

tips of fingers holding onto wall.

How Kilroy could be here, nobody knows

Lots of stories, some even true I suppose

 

Stalin in the bathroom as he zipped his fly

saw the Kilroy was Here graffitti.

Hitler thought it was a code name for a spy

Demanded to know,  ‘Who is this guy?’

 

A song and poem in the 1940’s

References in pictures, radio shows

In a 50’s  Isaac Asimov Short Story

Lucy and Snoopy in Peanuts mentioned him too, don’t  you know?

Styx in the 80’s named their album for him (– groovy).

Popeye, Seinfield, Bugs Bunny even Hogan’s Heroes

mentioned Kilroy and last year Kevin Smith made a movie.

 

George Washington didn’t sleep everywhere

But inside walls, even under the pier,

almost anywhere you might venture

you’ll find  Kilroy was Here.

 

More about Kilroy right Here

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NaPoWriMo 30/30 April 27,2018

April 26, 2018

“To write well, express yourself like the common people, but think like a wise man.”― Aristotle

NaPoWriMo Day 27, 2018

“Literature is strewn with the wreckage of those who have minded beyond reason the opinion of others.” ― Virginia Woolf

Before we mention today’s prompt…. Let me remind you that Saturday is Independent Bookstore Day.   Try to visit three independent bookstores near you in the next few days and of course buy something if you can.  In the Seattle/Western Washington area ( and in many other areas) you can earn a coupon by visiting 3 bookstores!   Read.  Read a lot and support your friendly neighborhood bookstores too!  BookTree’s Independent bookstore day page!  

NaPoWriMo – 30/30 –  Poem-a-Day prompt for April 27, 2018

“You cannot hope to sweep someone else away by the force of your writing until it has been done to you.” ― Stephen King

From Brendan (Cosmic Egg) McBreen :  The writing is on the wall, find a piece of graffiti or a bumper sticker and write about that line, include the line in your poem.

Keep Writing!

“You don’t write about the horrors of war. No. You write about a kid’s burnt socks lying in the road.” ― Richard Price

My prompt poem for the 25th –  Ted Kooser inspired

Kooser Apples

By Christpher J. Jarmick

Somewhere

under the canopy of billions

of twinkling lights

beyond the shimmering nova light

of the busy city

behind the white picket fence

and lace curtains made by hand

nearly 100 years ago

a saucepan lid shimmies

letting steam escape

and fill the kitchen with the

sweet, fresh smell of apples

and cinnamon turning into what

you crave right now as you read this:

Applesauce.

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NaPoWriMo 30/30 April 25, 2018

April 24, 2018

“Wisdom is easy to carry but difficult to load.”― Ted Kooser

NaPoWriMo Writing Prompt for April 25, 2018

“Don’t talk to me about the stars, about how cold and indifferent they are, about the unimaginable distances. There are millions of stars within us that are just as far, and people like me sometimes burn up a whole life trying to reach them.” ― Ted Kooser

We’re on the homestretch for NaPoWriMo 2018.  I hope if you’ve been playing along at home that you are enjoying the challenge and developing a daily writing habit that will serve you well in the coming year.  Whether you are writing poems that with some re-writing and editing will be published or just flexing your creative muscles, you should pat yourself on the back for taking part in the challenge.

NaPoWriMo – 30/30 –  Poem-a-Day prompt for April 25, 2018

There are mornings when everything brims with promise, even my empty cup. – Ted Kooser

April 25- Happy Birthday Ted Kooser (1939)  our 13th US poet laureate.  His poetry seems to be rooted in the Mid-West and captures a vanishing way of life without being overly nostalgic.   So write a ‘Kooser’ poem today.

Keep Writing!

There’s nothing wrong with delighting in what you do. In fact, most of the fun you’ll have as a poet will come about during the process of writing. – Ted Kooser

My Prompt 23 Poem  – Somehow evoke these three writers/poets: Shakespeare, Vladimir Nabokov and Oregon-born poet Edwin (Man with a Hoe) Markham.

Lines Not Written In Oregon

By Christopher J. Jarmick

 

Esmeralda! Can we rest

in this bewitched place of the West?

The weight of centuries bears down.

I lean upon the hoe, gazing toward sacred ground.

What breath blew out the light

inside my brain forever preventing flight

even as a dream echo asks why

as I stare at monarch butterfly?

I hear the blue birds, see green upon green

And yet I merely stand by this hoe and lean.

Profaned, disinherited, no one left to trust

But on this spot, I stand, I must

This be my place and here I shall rust.

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NaPoWriMo 30/30 April 23, 2018

April 22, 2018

A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool. – William Shakespeare

It is better to rust out than wear out.  – Edwin Markham

Do not be angry with the rain; it simply does not know how to fall upwards. Vladimir Nabokov

NaPoWriMo Writing Prompt for April 23, 2018

And this, our life, exempt from public haunt, finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything. – William Shakespeare

The writer’s job is to get the main character up a tree, and then once they are up there, throw rocks at them. – Vladimir Nabokov

NaPoWriMo – 30/30 –  Poem-a-Day prompt for April 23, 2018

April 23 –  William Shakespeare  (1564 to 1616),  author & poet, Vladimir Nabokov (1899 to 1977) and Oregon-born poet Edwin Markham (1852 to 1940) were all born this day.  Can you write a poem that somehow evokes all three?

The breaking of a wave cannot explain the whole sea. -Vladimir Nabokov

Force cannot transmit a moral principle: moral ideas can be received only through the reason of the heart. – Edwin Markham

We think not in words but in shadows of words. – Vladimir Nabokov

Keep Writing

My poem for prompt # 21  Write about light and use some scientific terms.

Electromagnetic Radiation

By Christopher J. Jarmick

The exitance of illuminance

radiating from the Luminaire was spectacular

seemingly a large constellation,

small galaxy of shining, scintillating luster.

I joked to my English friend I was feeling phototropic

and asked how many footcandles he would estimate

we were experiencing.

“Footlamberts, you mean….’ he said.

‘Lumens then,’ I countered.

‘It’s not the highest value

or we would be in white out.

Not a lot of noise or even reflectance either.’ he sparked.

I glared at him.

‘Not much of that either,’ he twinkled.

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NaPoWriMo 30/30 April 21, 2018

April 20, 2018

“Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly — they’ll go through anything. You read and you’re pierced.” ― Aldous Huxley

NaPoWriMo Writing Prompt for April 21, 2018

 “One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple.” ― Jack Kerouac

Let there be light on this 21st day of NaPoWriMo!  Let the light shine in, shine bright.  Yes, our prompt today has something to do with this of course.  How did you know?  If you are near the Kirkland Wa area, BookTree has a free workshop followed by a free reading and open mic featuring James Bertolino and Anita K. BoyleFacebook Event Page Here  

NaPoWriMo – 30/30 –  Poem-a-Day prompt for April 21, 2018

Today’s prompt is from writer/poet Brendan (Cosmic Egg) McBreen:

On a lighter note, write about light. Is it a wave, is it a particle, be ‘sciency’ and write a poem about light. Try to include at least three scientific terms relating to light.

Keep Writing!

“The difference between the almost right word and the right word

is really a large matter

 ’tis the difference between the lightning bug and the lightning.”

― Mark Twain

 

Prompt Poem # 19   An Etheridge Knight inspired write.

 

Apostacy Part 2

By Christopher J. Jarmick

 

His woman done left him

And so… and so…

He be damn angry

F. .  this and that

And damn the sun,

the perfect weather, the breeze,

the ripples on the water on the lake,

because there’s no hand to hold,

no reason to appreciate

no reason to be nice,

to dress up, to be smooth

and talk like candy.

No reason to feel lighter than air

smile, just because,

no reason t’all.

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NaPoWriMo 30/30 April 18, 2018

April 17, 2018

 “A good poem is a contribution to reality. The world is never the same once a good poem has been added to it. A good poem helps to change the shape of the universe, helps to extend everyone’s knowledge of himself and the world around him.” ― Dylan Thomas

NaPoWriMo Writing Prompt for April 18, 2018

“I write for the same reason I breathe – because if I didn’t, I would die.” ― Isaac Asimov

Welcome to day 18.  British philosopher writer and speaker, Alan W Watts, best known as an interpreter and popularizer of Eastern philosophy for a Western audience, ‘advice quote’ seems particularly apt to share:

“Advice? I don’t have advice. Stop aspiring and start writing. If you’re writing, you’re a writer. Write like you’re a goddamn death row inmate and the governor is out of the country and there’s no chance for a pardon. Write like you’re clinging to the edge of a cliff, white knuckles, on your last breath, and you’ve got just one last thing to say, like you’re a bird flying over us and you can see everything, and please, for God’s sake, tell us something that will save us from ourselves. Take a deep breath and tell us your deepest, darkest secret, so we can wipe our brow and know that we’re not alone. Write like you have a message from the king. Or don’t. Who knows, maybe you’re one of the lucky ones who doesn’t have to.”

― Alan W. Watts

NaPoWriMo – 30/30 –  Poem-a-Day prompt for April 18, 2018

From prompt meister extraordinaire Brendan (Cosmic Egg) McBreen :  Imagine you are at the beach and you find a message in an old bottle. What does the message say? Write a response the message as a poem.

“So long as you write what you wish to write, that is all that matters; and whether it matters for ages or only for hours, nobody can say.”  ― Virginia Woolf

Keep Writing!

“What’s writing really about? It’s about trying to take fuller possession of the reality of your life.”― Ted Hughes

Prompt 16 poem–  Write a poem that evokes or is about Sam Hamill.

The River Crossed (for Sam)

By Christopher J. Jarmick

 

The river crossed

washes away the dirt of the journey.

Stand a moment

be clean, reset.

Breathe deep.

 

Stay a moment in a safe place.

The teaching surpasses the teacher.

Discipline must be learned

and is necessary.

 

When you must eat bitter fruit

to survive,

when isolation brings peace

but the world gets smaller,

louder, meaner;

when the hand you reach for

is no longer near

and you stumble in the mud

let the river crossed

wash away the dirt of the journey.