Posts Tagged ‘National Poetry Month’

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NaPoWriMo Prompts for April 8 & 9 2019 plus prompt poems.

April 7, 2019

“A writer should have the precision of a poet and the imagination of a scientist.” —   Vladimir Nabokov

My bookstore in Kirkland has several upcoming FREE events.  BookTree events calendar here.

Prompt for April 8  (write poem to this prompt on April 8th  )  From Brendan McBreen :

8 lines

8letters

plus or minus

pick eight letters

write eight lines without using those eight letters

can you write eight lines only using eight letters?

Happy poeming!

“The first draft of anything is sh**.” – – Ernest Hemingway.

Prompt for April 9    (write poem to this prompt on April 9th  )

“Each thing you add to your story (or poem) is a drop of paint falling into clear water; it spreads through and colors everything.”Lisa Cron

Play with the poetic device known as Anaphora.  Come up with a short phrase that has several meanings and could be used in a few different way in the poem you write today.  Use and repeat a short phrase that has several meanings in the poem you write today.  Do a play on an Anaphora (or an epanaplesis).

“Writing is an exploration. You start from nothing and learn as you go.”  – – E. L. Doctorow

Keep Writing!

And here are the poems I’ve written to the prompts over the last few days.

April 4 Prompt  (use several anagrams of your name in a poem)

Not a Rich Strophe

By Rich Herstop  Jarmick

“I’d like to Crop her Shirt”

He mumbled staring inappropriately

at the buxom bartender.

“You couldn’t crop her Shit,”

I quipped.

Bored, I noticed the hipster was sketching some torchiers

And he explained how the ostrich was erotic, but I was

lost in my thoughts regarding the rhetorics of Plato.

Then a chorister tried to recruit me

to join the chirpers on Sunday.

I just wasn’t in the mood to perch, share pitchers,

munch chips, watch sports or tell stories.

 

I used several full and partial anagrams of my name – Christopher in this poem.

 

Prompt 5    use 7 or more words for Falling

Can’t help. . .

By Christopher J. Jarmick

There is an amorousness I feel,

an inclination bordering on rapture,

part soft-spot, part fervor.

A flame burns that makes me feel both all powerful and

full of weakness.

Oh what’s the phrase I’m looking for?

I’m slipping on sentiment

collapsing into infatuation

descending into emotion

plunging into ardor

sliding into devotion.

Almost, yes, but not quite the phrase I’m thinking of.

I’m tumbling in delight

settling into devotion

sinking into affection

slipping into lust

toppling in zeal

tottering in appreciation.

No no.. what’s that song….?

I know as soon as I get busy doing something else

I’ll remember it.

Oh well.

Poem Starter 1405 (inspired by the falling prompt)

By Christopher J. Jarmick

Missed my ride

on the Turnip truck

with Grace.

 

Prompt 6   invent some paint color name and use them in a poem

BlueTruth

by Christopher J. Jarmick

The politician whose skin was the hue of origine,

and his wife decked out in an outfit of celebrity spice with caged coral accents

walked through the translucenteen arboretum

under the cloud covered fondue crème’ sky

taking in the the Canurple and Dread Salmon colored johnny jump-ups,

and the Lavenberry bushes.

In the cacti house they were tickled by

blooms of Maganana, licorice rain, turgid turmeric and speal.

A news reporter asked: What’s your favorite color?

“Lurple of course,” He answered.

She knew even that was a lie.

 

Prompt 7   write at least formal and one informal Septolet

 

Vertical Transparency (formal, syllable ) Septolet

By Christopher J. Jarmick

Wall

On the

Border of

United States

Mexico

Mirrors

Trump.

 

BookTree (informal, word) Septolet

By Christopher J. Jarmick

Store offers

knowledge, escapes

how tos, biographies

in portable,

battery free

old fashion

books.

 

Maya Angelou Inspired (formal) Septolet

By Christopher J. Jarmick

Trust

when he

has shown you

exactly who

he is thrice

believe

him.

The first 5 drafts of anything are probably not worth publishing but you know you are onto something at some point during revision number 3.Christopher J. Jarmick

KEEP WRITING!!!

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NaPoWriMo Prompts April 4 to 7 and Prompt poems too!

April 3, 2019

“Words are our most inexhaustible source of magic.” J. K. Rowling.

Here are suggested prompt for the next 4 days.  Use the one for April 4th to write your poem on April 4th.  Remember to write a poem each and every day.  If you only have 30 minutes to write…  write what you can in that time.  We are writing first (not final) draughts.  This is a challenge, an exercise, a way to begin a new habit of writing each and every day.

“A professional writer is an amateur who didn’t quit.” –  Richard Bach

Prompt for April 4 (write poem this prompt on April 4th)

Words inside of words creating other words.  The Anagram.  Put your name into an Anagram generator like this one   Use several of the generated words in a poem that is not quite about yourself but has some autobiographical things in it.  In other words.. you are buried within the poem using words generated from you name (but not your name and not completely a self-portrait poem).  Remember the prompts are meant to be an inspirational challenge – there is no right or wrong way to ‘follow the rules’ of a prompt.

“Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” – –Anton Chekhov

Prompt for April 5   (write poem to this prompt on April 5th  ) From Brendan McBreen

“Don’t forget— no one else sees the word the way you do, so no one else can tell the stories you have to tell.” – –Charles de Lint

look up

write a poem which includes seven references to falling.

“Start writing, no matter what. The water does not flow until the faucet is turned on.” Louis L’Amour

Prompt for April 6   (write poem to this prompt on April 6th  )

 “This is how you do it; you sit down at the keyboard and you put one word after another until it’s done. It’s that easy, and that hard.” – – Neil Gaiman

You know how they have all these interesting names for paint colors?  First create some odd combinations of words for colors   salsa red probably exists but angst auger for example would be a unique one.  Create 3 to 5 of these and then use them in a poem.

“Your intuition knows what to write, so get out of the way.”  – – Ray Bradbury

Prompt for April  7   (write poem to this prompt on April  7th )

“The only writer to whom you should compare yourself is the writer you were yesterday.”  – – David Schlosser

And on the seventh day, we concentrate on the seven line poetry form known as the Septolet.  Write two or more Septolets!   Suggest you write a formal and informal Septolet.

“Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.”Pablo Picasso

Write two different types of Septolets today.  (Sep-toe-lay) 1- 7 lines 16 syllables  2- 14 words – 7 lines.

Septolet 1 Formal: Line 1 has one syllable, Line 2 has two, Line 3 has 3, Line 4 has 4 syllables, space, Line 5 has 3, Line 6 has 2, Line 7 has one syllable. Poem should relate to one thought, feeling, object, place.

Septolet 2 Informal: Total of 14 words in 7 lines, no line should have more than three words. The poem should relate to one subject, object, thought or feeling. The first four lines create a coherent picture or thought, the last three lines create another. Each could stand separately, but both are related.

Examples:

Formal Syllable Septolet                                          Informal Word Septolet

 

One                           1 syllable                                    “This

Second                        2 syllables                                    is easy

Or perhaps                 3 syllables                                 anyone can do

Four ticking bombs   4 syllables                                it,”

 

Blank space

 

Reminder                  3 syllables                                said

That you’re               2 syllables                                tightrope walker.

Late                              1 syllable                               “but don’t look down!”

 

The example on the left side is the more formal syllable Septolet.  The one on the right is made up of 14 words. (You don’t count syllables).  4 word maximum on one line.

 

ORIGIN

The origin of the Septolet –a French form is not completely known. It’s most likely origin is based in music since a septuplet is a group of seven notes played in a very specific way. It’s a member of the musical tuplet family—the most common one in use: the triplet. The septuplets (septolets or septimoles) usually indicate 7 notes in the duration of 4—or in compound meter 7 for 6—but may sometimes be used to mean 7 notes in the duration of 8.

In the poetic form however meter is not required so the music connection is perhaps NOT correct. The form has evolved as a sort of European/American Haiku . The more formal version is with syllables, the less formal derivation (American) is with words of any syllable length. 7 lines broken into two stanzas. The first stanza is 4 lines. Then a blank line. Then three more lines. The formal version uses 14 syllables, the informal version uses 14 words. You can order the words 1, 2,3,3, BREAK 2, 2, 1 if you would like or you can simply use a total of 14 words with some lines having up to three words and others having one or all lines having two words.

The writer is by nature a dreamer— a conscious dreamer.”  — Carson McCullers

Keep Writing!

PROMPT POEMS I’ve written for April 1, April 2 and Today!

April 1 poem using Shakespeare quotes

Inside a pickle

By Christopher J. Jarmick

All of a sudden, as good luck would have it,

a NapoWriMo spell was spoke:

Eye of newt, and toe of frog,

wool of bat, and tongue of dog,

adder’s fork, and blind-worm’s sting,

lizard’s leg, and owlet’s wing,

adverb and semi-colon

double toil and trouble;

fire burn, and caldron bubble.

And I found myself in a pickle.

Though this be madness, truth will out

and thereby hangs a tale.

Woe is me as a pickle under the greenwood tree.

While you live, tell truth and shame the devil

the game is up and I suffer the crack of doom,

the be all and end all

as a pickle.

Son of a bitch!

Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.

I have not slept one wink,

a victim of foul play

at one fell swoop,

a sorry sight

Brevity is the soul of wit

so I will fight fire with fire

for ever and a day

inside a pickle under the greenwood tree.

April 2nd ‘opposite’ prompt

A line by line ‘opposite’ poem of #20 (aka the Pennycandystore Beyond the El by Lawrence Felinghetti from Coney Island of the Mind)

 

Etisoppo 02#

Yb

kcimraJ .J rehpotsirhC

 

Too late!  Too Late!

They laughed.

Inside the seeds were jumping

His knees were inhaling in the great room

His feet were dry

A man walked out

The moon had sucked up the wind

inside those seeds were jumping as they came to life

And celery

And carrot cake

And broccoli stones

slept beneath the still dog,

on that June early morn.

Peanut butter darkened with complete optimism

in reality

rising with hate

The last lost

sour forest below the mountain.

 

April 3 prompt – “three in a row.”

THREED AT LAST

By Christopher J. Jarmick

“Government of the people, by the people, for the people.” — Abraham Lincoln

 

Three times three cubed

Abraham learned the cipher:

for three is to nine as two is to six.

 

Tell me and I may forget, teach me and I will remember

But involve me and I will learn and when I learn, and earn

and yearn, I shall have a happy life.

 

Three times tempted

Three times the cock crows

Three times denied

 

The rule of the Three-fold law

Says whatever you put out there will be returned to you three times.

The truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth

 

The trinity, the trilogy,

the magic of three

the curse of three

 

You can survive three weeks without food.

three days without water

three minutes without air

 

My Three Sons

The Three Musketeers

Three Billy Goats Gruff,

 

Three Little Pigs,

Three Faces of Eve,

The Third Man.

 

Rule of thirds, triad

My three siblings

My three daughters

 

Veni, vidi, vici!

Click your heels together three times.

Three times the charm.

 

Three, two,

One,

write.

KEEP WRITING!

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NaPoWrimo 2019 Prompts for April 2 and April 3.

April 1, 2019

“Be courageous and try to write in a way that scares you a little.” Holley Gerth

Here are prompts for Day 2 and Day 3 of NaPoWriMo.

Write a poem a day using these or other prompts.   Share them if you dare.

“You fail only if you stop writing.” Ray Bradbury

Prompt for April 2nd   (write the poem to this prompt on April 2nd)   From Brendan McBreen

opposites

find a short poem written by someone else (perhaps share the poem along with yours)

now, line by line

write the exact opposite of each line

in reverse order

‘Failing in writing is horrible but it’s not like failing in sky-diving or mountain climbing.  You will live to write another day. ‘–  Christopher J. Jarmick

Prompt for April 3rd (write poem this prompt on April 3rd)

The prompt for today is “three in a row.” Perhaps three in a row means you’ve won  a game (tic tac toe) or some money from a slot machine.  Or perhaps the superstition of how things come in threes (the blessed trinity, three deaths, injuries, failing household appliances etc.)  Think about any sets of three you have in your life, a trilogy or think about ‘third time’s a charm, a trio of musicians, the Three Stooges…. Have at it.

Poem Starter 3

By Christopher J. Jarmick

“If you read enough

you’ll know when

what you write is right.”

Keep Writing!!! 

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NaPoWriMo begins. April 1 Prompt.

March 31, 2019

“If you wait for inspiration to write you’re not a writer, you’re a waiter.”  – Dan Poynter.

Have you ever written a poem a day for 30 days straight and shared these poems almost immediately?

That’s what thousands of writers and poets do during National Poetry Month every April.   You write and share first drafts.  You challenge yourself to write a poem off of a prompt.  Your deadline for publishing it is less than 24 hours.  You might only have an hour or maybe less than 30 minutes some days to write something.  Write something and dare to share it too.  Crazy right?  Write.

“Love the work: the grind, the dreaming, the distracted not-sleep, all of it. It’s the one thing in the job that will always be there, and the real pleasure in the profession. Everything else is luck.”Glen Hirshberg

Welcome to NaPoWriMo.

I have very little time this year to participate.  I run a bookstore (BookTree in Kirkland website)  and have other responsibilities that make it very difficult to blog every day.

So I will be posting messages and prompts that cover a few days at a time.   And I will post my own scribbles as I am able.  I will be writing to the prompts I share and perhaps to a few other prompts I find throughout the month too.    I will share at least 30 daily poems as I have the time to share them.

Participating and sharing prompts and what you are writing may begin a dialogue with someone you’ve never met.  Perhaps something you write will develop into an excellent poem or a story.  You never know.  It’s an exercise, a challenge, a way to take a journey.  Feel free to share and comment.

Some of the prompts this year have been suggested by Brendan McBreen a talented poet who lives in the Auburn area and has been an active member of The Striped Water Poets for several years.  He’s got a collection of poetry you should put on your short list of books to buy and read.   It was published by MoonPath Press and is called:   Cosmic Egg.     Clicking on it will take you to the website.  He may not be able to post his writings this year (as he’s done in the past) but we’ll see.

“Step into a scene and let it drip from your fingertips.” – M J Bush.

My Bookstore (BookTree Facebook page ) will be have several poetry related events this April.  If you are near the Kirkland area, be sure and check them out (they are FREE!).  Like the Facebook page too and if you are in Western Washington share our events to help our events get more notice!  Thanks.

PROMPT FOR APRIL 1, 2019

The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.Shakespeare, As You Like It

Use at least 3 of the 135 phrases Shakespeare takes credit for making famous in a poem.

You can use many more if you would like (try 14 perhaps?) You’ll find a list of them right here: Shakespeare quotes

I must learn to love the fool in me – the one who feels too much, talks too much, takes too many chances, wins sometimes and loses often, lacks self-control, loves and hates, hurts and gets hurt, promises and breaks promises, laughs and cries.”  –Theodore Isaac Rubin

KEEP WRITING!!!

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NaPoWriMo 30/30 May 1, 2018

April 30, 2018

“Don’t get it right – get it WRITTEN!” ― Lee Child

NaPoWriMo Day 31

Whether or not you wrote in rhyme

wrote mostly junk or something sublime

writing every day is hardly a crime

and though you didn’t earn a dime

here’s hoping you had a marvelous time!

“To me, the greatest pleasure of writing is not what it’s about, but the music the words make.” ― Truman Capote

Thank you Brendan McBreen for contributing some wonderful, challenging prompts for NaPoWriMo 2018.   Use and re-use these prompts anytime, anywhere.

“Dance above the surface of the world. Let your thoughts lift you into creativity that is not hampered by opinion.” ― Red Haircrow

Keep Reading and Reading and Reading and Writing!

If you are near Kirkland, Wa.  Drop in to BookTree Bookstore at 609 Market St. Kirkland, WA 98033   Say “NaPoWriMo 2018, Poetry is Everything, Please give me 10% off my purchase” (available once per patron through May 31, 2018 – excluding certain collectors and special merchandise).  Please ‘Like’ BookTree’s Facebook page here.    Thank You!

“That’s all we have, finally, the words, and they had better be the right ones.” ― Raymond Carver

Here are my poems written from prompt 29 and prompt 30.

My poem for prompt 29, which involves finding someone else’s laundry in the dryer

Stormy’s Laundry

By Christopher J. Jarmick

 

Dear Stormy,

I leave this worn but still provocative 38 double d

lace bra for you, pinned to this board

in hopes you will soon be

back.  I had to prove I’m no liar

(and for the record I don’t know Comey)

but I do have everything you left in the dryer.

I’ll keep it all for a week or so

And then I’m sure my wife will say

either those clothes or she will go.

 

I’ll donate them soon, so please

if you give me mine, I’ll give you yours.

No questions asked, which ain’t easy

because based on the volume of lacy pretty things

which seems to prove your profession is a little bit hipper

than being an accountant.  I mean all the frills and strings

clearly means you must be a professional stripper.

 

However you are not out of luck

as I figure this wardrobe costs more than a buck

or two  than what I wore when I was here today

a quite memorable one for me, I now must say.

Here’s hoping you’ll notice something is amiss

And soon return here to find this,

your lost bra and a little note from

Chris.

 

My Prompt 30 poem –  something old, new, borrowed and blue

 

And still we wait

By Christopher J. Jarmick

 

He’s Baudelaire drunk

on Ferlinghetti’s poetic blue America

where politicians return to representing the people,

including the rich, the poor, the recent immigrants and the homeless.

 

We were caught in a storm but all is calm for now.

 

Be still. Breathe in, look

beyond the shimmering nova light.

Let the hopes, dreams and ideals

wash away the dirt of the journey.

We write louder than hate and now

several of us are throwing bottles with notes in them

into the oceans believing our imaginations will inspire one to ask;

what are these words worth, William, tell

us this love, this wisdom is also part of the real America we have waited for.

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NaPoWriMo 30/30 April 30, 2018

April 29, 2018

 “A poem begins with a lump in the throat; a homesickness or a love sickness. It is a reaching-out toward expression; an effort to find fulfillment. A complete poem is one where an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words.” ― Robert Frost

NaPoWriMo Writing Prompt for April 30, 2018

Ta Da!  This is it.  The end of NaPoWriMo 2018.  The last official prompt for the 2018 National Poetry Month challenge.  I know the prompts inspired by challenge or by guilt at least a couple of poets out there reading this blog.  It was particularly tough for me to find the time to do this blog and write poems every day plus run the bookstore.  But…sometimes it’s fun and there’s a bit of a sense of accomplishment too.  Wrap up tomorrow and my final two prompt poems.

NaPoWriMo – 30/30 –  Poem-a-Day prompt for April 30, 2018

Prompt 30 – Something old, something borrowed, something blue — Our poem will be 8 to 12 lines. Every other line (lines 2, 4, 6 and 8 and possibly 10 and 12) will be brand new lines that you write. One or more of these lines will include something blue.

For lines 1, 3, 5, 7, and possibly, 9 and 11 use lines from two to three of the poems you have written in the last 30 days.

Keep Writing!

“Write what disturbs you, what you fear, what you have not been willing to speak about. Be willing to be split open.”  ― Natalie Goldberg

Poem from prompt 28 – write a poem using two or more title from the non-fiction best-sellers list

Not just a list of 15 best-selling non-fiction books

By Christopher J. Jarmick

 

A higher loyalty does trump fascism

though some insist with fire and fury

it’s still like playing Russian roulette which you’d think

all of the highly educated would avoid and opt for something

less risky like astrophysics for people in a hurry or

understanding our 50-state border crisis, factfulness

or just reading a book (like one about Obama).

Will God save Texas if we make trouble and say things like

this is me and if you  don’t like it, well, I’ll be gone in the dark

to start some secret empires of my own

that might lead to killing the deep state?

Well, it’s a bit beyond just another day in the life

of Marlon Bundo, if you ask me, don’t you agree?

NYT Bestselling Non-Fiction List

  1. NEW THIS WEEK

    A HIGHER LOYALTY

    by James Comey

  2. 2 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    FASCISM: A Warning

    by Madeleine Albright with Bill Woodward

  3. 6 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    RUSSIAN ROULETTE

    by Michael Isikoff and David Corn

  4. 16 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    FIRE AND FURY

    by Michael Wolff

     

  5. 51 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN A HURRY

    by Neil deGrasse Tyson

  6. 9 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    EDUCATED

    by Tara Westover

  7. 8 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    I’LL BE GONE IN THE DARK

    by Michelle McNamara

  8. NEW THIS WEEK

    GOD SAVE TEXAS

    by Lawrence Wright

  9. 3 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    MAKE TROUBLE

    by Cecile Richards with Lauren Peterson

  10. 17 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    OBAMA

    by Pete Souza

  11. 5 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    SECRET EMPIRES

    by Peter Schweizer

  12. 3 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    FACTFULNESS

    by Hans Rosling with Ola Rosling and Anna Rosling Rönnlund

  13. 4 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    THIS IS ME

    by Chrissy Metz

  14. 3 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    OUR 50-STATE BORDER CRISIS

    by Howard Buffett

  15. 3 WEEKS ON THE LIST

    KILLING THE DEEP STATE

    by Jerome R. Corsi

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NaPoWriMo 30/30 April 29, 2018

April 28, 2018

“Any writer worth his salt writes to please himself…It’s a self-exploratory operation that is endless. An exorcism of not necessarily his demon, but of his divine discontent.” ― Harper Lee

NaPoWriMo Writing Prompt for April 29, 2018

“Only those things are beautiful which are inspired by madness and written by reason.” ― André Gide

And then there were 2…    Almost over….and guess what?  It’s time to do the laundry!

NaPoWriMo – 30/30 –  Poem-a-Day prompt for April 27, 2018

Another prompt from Brendan (Cosmic Egg) McBreen –  Imagine opening the dryer and finding someone else’s laundry, write a brief poem describing this person based on their laundry.

“I love being a writer. What I can’t stand is the paperwork.” – Peter De Vries
Keep Writing!

My prompt poem for Day 26  (I posted Day 27 yesterday…and out of the usual order I have been posting). The prompt was to create a list of words from a book.   My Wordscame  from page 26/27 of Body & Soul by Frank Conroy (only a few paragraphs on page 26 so went to page 27 to finish random word lists

Words:   Moved, side, winter, piano, method, bills

 

Write 2 different poems with the words

 

Paying the bills

Christopher J. Jarmick

 

My foolproof method involved moving

the bills from one side of the counter

to the piano and I would pay them the following Friday.

Last winter they were moved

to the magazine pile on the coffee table,

so most were paid late.

 

Ghost Piano

By Christopher J. Jarmick

 

Last winter the piano

was moved from the house

I grew up in.

I learned the Bastien method

for a couple years from  a teacher

who gave lessons to pay the bills

and on the side was part of a blues/jazz ensemble.

 

When I visited the house

I stared at the place the piano once occupied.

My knees involuntarily began to bend

as I thought about sitting on the bench

to play a few simple chords.